Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Click to register.
Community Search
Calendar

10/5/2016
Book Tour Webinars: Candyce Reynolds October 5, 2016

10/26/2016 » 10/28/2016
ePIC 2016, 14th conference on ePortfolios, Open Badges, Personal Ledgers, Identities, Trust

11/7/2016 » 11/8/2016
Southeast Regional Conference at Virginia Tech

1/28/2017
AAC&U Eportfolio Forum

7/24/2017 » 7/27/2017
AAEEBL Annual Conference

Member Spotlight
Laura Gambino, Guttman Community CollegeCo-author of "High Impact ePortfolio Practice" Jan 2017 publication

Reflection Rubric
Share |

 

Reflective Writing for SLCC’s Gen Ed ePortfolio: A Common Sense Rubric

Levels of Performance

Criteria

Exceeds Expectations

Meets Expectations

Progressing Towards Expectations

Clearly Below Expectations

Language Use

The writer always uses engaging language, and his/her voice is clear and compelling.

The writer usually employs engaging language, and his/her voice is apparent.

The writer sometimes uses engaging language, but his/her voice seems to be lost most of the time.

The writer uses language that fails to engage the reader at all. The writer's voice seems to be completely missing.

Context and Reference

The writer clearly understands that s/he is writing for an audience beyond the instructor, and therefore sets the context for the assignment and the reflection prompt. The writer refers to specific features of the work s/he turned in.

The writer generally recognizes that s/he is writing for an audience beyond the instructor, and therefore sets the context for the assignment and the reflection prompt. The writer refers to specific features of the work s/he turned in.

The writer makes some attempt to set the context. S/he makes vague references to the work s/he turned in.

The writer jumps right into the reflection without setting the context, and s/he makes no references to the work s/he turned in.

Depth of Reflection

The writer directly addresses the reflection prompt(s) given by the instructor, elaborates his/her points, makes real connections between the assignment and his/her learning, highlights new insights and perspectives, and/or uses techniques such as questioning, comparing, interpreting, and analyzing.

The writer addresses the reflection prompt(s) given by the instructor, and does a fairly good job with elaboration, making connections, offering new insights and perspectives, and/or uses techniques such as questioning, comparing, interpreting, and analyzing.

The writer partially addresses the reflection prompt(s) given by the instructor, and fails to sufficiently elaborate his/her points. S/he makes few connections, offers few insights and perspectives, etc.

The writer fails to address the reflection prompt(s) given by the instructor. The reflection piece contains no elaboration and is too short.

Conventions of Standard Edited English

The writer demonstrates a solid grasp of standard writing conventions (e.g., spelling, punctuation, capitalization, sentence structure, word choice, paragraphing) and uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Errors are practically non-existent.

The writer usually demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions and uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. The presence of few errors makes the piece generally enjoyable to read.

The writer shows some control over standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability.

Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, grammar and paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read.


Notes for Students

Language Use--It's very difficult to describe the differences between engaging writing that conveys a sense of voice and its opposite, but every one of your instructors can recognize the former as distinct from--and better than--the latter. In strong reflective writing, a bit of your personality and character should shine through to the reader due to the distinctive way you phrase your thoughts and due to the choice of words you use. That's your "voice." Unlike in most signature assignments, it's okay to write in first person in your reflective writing. So you can write "I think" this and "I noticed" that in your reflective writing. Engaging writing uses language that is interesting, compelling, and captivating; it pulls the reader into the mind of the writer, instead of being a stale, forgettable recitation of facts.

Context and Reference--Your instructor knows about your work and the reflective writing accompanying it, because s/he made the assignment. However, other people with whom you share your ePortfolio will not know the context of each page in your ePortfolio. If you jump right into your reflective writing without setting the proper context, most readers are going to be confused. At some point in your reflective writing (usually in the opening sentences) you need to encapsulate the assignment and the reflective writing prompt that have combined to elicit your brilliant thoughts. Try to do this is an imaginative way, rather than writing something like "For this class I had to write an essay about George Orwell's 1984, and now I'm going to reflect on how my essay is a good example of critical analysis." Boring.

In addition to setting the context, effective reflective writing almost always makes reference(s) to specific elements of your work on the signature assignment(s). These references to your work constitute good evidence for the claims you are making in your reflective writing.

Depth of Reflection--First of all, make sure you address the reflection prompt given to you by the instructor. Elaborate your points with analysis, connection-making, questioning, comparisons, interpretations, and insights about yourself, your learning, or the wider world that are initiated by the assignment and the reflective writing prompt. Reflective writing is difficult for many of us; it takes a certain amount of courage, so go ahead and risk a little by pushing yourself as you translate your thoughts into writing.

Conventions of Standard Edited English--Your ePortfolio is a formal presentation of your academic self that you share with SLCC instructors, friends, family, scholarship committees, and possibly others. Therefore you want to ensure that not only are the artifacts in your ePortfolio representative of your best work on signature assignments, but that your reflective writing is also free from obvious mistakes. Don't let simple mistakes detract from the quality of your reflection.

Join AAEEBL Online!


Forgot your password?

Register 1st, then log in.

Latest News